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Elementary Science K–6
2020–2021

K–2 Science
Grades K–2

 

Thursday 10:00–10:55

Friday 10:00–10:55

Class, Material, and Copy Cost: $257
Supplies: Spiral notebook with pockets or 1” 3-ring binder with pocket folders and paper and pencil; crayons, markers, or colored pencils.
 

No Prerequisite Required

 

 

First Semester: Properties, Length and Capacity, Force and Motion—Students will gain a basic understanding of God’s world through a detailed analysis of physical sciences. They will develop science processing skills by observing, classifying, and sorting familiar objects. Color, shape, size, weight, and texture are among the properties investigated. They will practice measuring and will recognize the importance of standard measuring tools and units. They will also work with balances and other equipment to compare and contrast objects by weight, buoyancy, magnetic attraction, and material composition. As they practice distinguishing and grouping objects, they also build vital vocabulary skills. Students explore force and motion with hands-on activities to measure force. They compare the relative work of moving objects and then discover how simple machines make work easier by reducing the amount of force needed. They lift with levers, roll with wheels and axles, and raise with fixed and movable pulleys. They drag loads up inclined planes, separate objects with wedges, and secure wood blocks with screws. Young scientists crank gears, decrease friction, and investigate household gadgets to identify what makes them labor-saving devices.

Second Semester: Wonderful Water, Sink and Float, States of Matter—Students explore water, the most abundant substance on Earth, using many tools and techniques, so they should be prepared for splashes and spills. After using their senses to determine some of water’s properties, students pour, mix, filter, and freeze water. They watch water climb, bubble, condense, and take different shapes. They also compare water to other liquids and experiment with filtering muddy water. Groups construct and test boats made from different materials to understand how shape and weight affect sinking and floating. They also explore the states of matter through hands-on experiences with blocks, balloons, and beakers to identify the distinctive properties of the three common states of matter. With a variety of lab tools, they observe, explore, and measure solids, liquids, and gases, and investigate the processes by which one changes into another. As students conduct melting, freezing, evaporation, and condensation experiments, they learn the importance of controlling variables and keeping records.

There is a $30 material and copy fee included in the cost of this class.

***This class is on a three–year rotation of subject matter.


 

2–4 Science
Grades 2–4

 

Thursday 9:00–9:55

Friday 9:00–9:55

Class, Material, and Copy Cost: $257
Supplies: Spiral notebook or 1” 3-ring binder with pocket folders, pencil; colored pencils, crayons, or markers.
 

No Prerequisite Required

 

 

First Semester: Magnets, Electrical Circuits, Lenses and Mirrors—Students will gain a basic understanding of God’s world through a detailed analysis of physical sciences. They will develop science processing skills by designing, constructing, and diagramming simple electrical circuits. They will investigate resistance in solid and liquid conductors and even make their own light bulbs and circuit fuses! They will discover the Law of Magnetic Attraction and learn about the principles that govern magnetic behavior and interaction. They experiment with magnets of various sizes and shapes, even our planet-sized magnet, to explore this invisible but observable force. They demonstrate magnetic fields and polarity using iron filings. They will make compasses that align with Earth’s magnetic poles, model temporary magnetism, and use a simple circuit and an iron nail to create an electromagnet. We will also learn about refraction and reflection as we experiment with light, mirrors, lenses, and filters.

Second Semester: Powders and Crystals, Simple Machines, Color and Light—The classroom will double as a chemistry lab when students identify six unknown substances that their senses tell them are very similar. First, they view the white particles with pocket scopes and differentiate between the powders and the crystals. After comparing the substances to named samples, students apply several tests to discover the chemical properties of each: the water test, vinegar test, iodine test, BTB test, and heat test. They will explore simple machines by measuring force as they lift, push, and pull loads and determine the mathematical relationship between force and work. They will build and operate classroom versions of the six simple machines: lever, wheel and axle, pulley, inclined plane, wedge, and screw. They will investigate how (and how much) each one makes work easier by magnifying, modifying, transferring, or changing the direction of the applied force. Complex machines will be explored and created as “contraptions” are designed by teams. Then the students will explore prisms, color filters, and pigments in order to determine the components of white light and the products of color mixing. *Students will be required to write short research papers (length based on grade level) on various topics throughout the year.

There is a $30 material and copy fee included inthe cost of this class.

***This class is on a three-year rotation of subject matter.


 

4–6 General Science
Grades 4–6

 

Thursday 11:00–11:55

Friday 11:00–11:55

Class, Material, and Copy Cost: $257
Supplies: Spiral notebook or 1” 3-ring binder with pocket folders, pencil; colored pencils, crayons, or markers.
 

No Prerequisite Required

 

 

First Semester: Electrical Connections, Electromagnetism, and Famous Scientists—Students will gain a basic understanding of God’s world through a detailed analysis of physical sciences. They will develop science processing skills as they build, operate, and analyze different electrical circuits and experiment with the variables that affect the current in each circuit. They will also look at simple energy converters and use circuits to model some common household devices. Students will explore the unique relationship between electricity and magnetism and how it can be manipulated to produce an electric current or a magnetic field. The students will also be introduced to famous scientists and some of the contributions they have made to human civilization.

Second Semester: Matter and Change, Atoms, and Newton’s Toy Box—Young chemists will hypothesize, test, and draw conclusions about the nature of matter. In this chemistry unit, students calculate liquid densities and apply filtration and evaporation to suspensions and solutions. They measure gas volumes and pressures to demonstrate Boyle’s law. They investigate atomic structure, learn to read the Periodic Table, and delve deeper into the Mystery of the Periodic Table. They conduct experiments: a neutralization reaction between bases and acids, an oxidations reaction that produces rust, and a double replacement reaction to form a precipitate. In Newton’s Toy Box, students will experiment with familiar toys and objects. As they explain their observations, they will prove Newton’s three laws of motion. The path of a tossed basketball, the flip of a grasshopper toy, and the endless swing of clackers will reinforce the concepts of inertia, gravity, acceleration, mass, force, and momentum. Students will engage in races, games and challenges that emphasize the laws of motion that govern every day. *Students will be required to write short research papers (length based on grade level) on various topics throughout the year.

There is a $30 copy and material fee included in the cost of this class.

***This class is on a three–year rotation of subject matter.


 

Comments or Questions?

GRACE Home School Association
6816 Bliss Ct. SW, Grandville, MI 49418
(616) 498-6673 or office@gracehsaonline.org